Here Are The Must-Try Burgers Across The United States (20 Photos)

The 20 Best Burgers In NYC – New York

Here Are The Must-Try Burgers Across The United States (20 Photos)

This wasn’t an easy list to make. There were nights we woke up screaming, having dreamed of burgers chasing us along cliffsides, asking why they hadn’t made the cut.

Whole days were spent in conference rooms with no food or water and no one going in or out until rankings were decided upon. And while some of that might be an exaggeration, you should know that we have eaten a lot of burgers and we are, in fact, burger experts.

So here it is: our list of the 20 best burgers in NYC. Trust us when we say that you’ll want to know what every single one of these tastes .

$$$$

$$$$ 919 Fulton St.

We can’t tell you what’s actually on Emily’s burger (without re-reading our review, but that would be cheating). And that’s because you don’t experience the Emmy Burger as ingredients.

You experience it as one cohesive unit of human emotion: joy, love, and fear – that nothing else will ever come close to this. There’s no other burger this in NYC, so if you want to experience it for yourself, get here early – a lot of other people want to eat it too.

(And if you really need to know about those ingredients, they are dry-aged beef, onion, melted cheddar, “Emmy sauce,” and a warm pretzel bun.)

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$$$$ 178 Broadway

You’ve eaten a full dinner here and you have the steak sauce in your fridge, but you may still be missing out on one of the key parts of the Peter Luger experience: the burger.

It’s only served at lunch, and it’s ideal for people who judge a burger 90% by the meat and 10% by everything else. It’s more than a half-pound of dry-aged beef served with nothing but a slice of raw onion.

The meat is good enough to eat by itself with a fork, but you should still add a giant, thick-cut slab of bacon.

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$$$$ 33 Cortlandt Alley

Chicago’s best burger arrived with about as much fanfare as the royal family at Wimbledon, and while almost any other stack of bread and ground beef would disappoint considering that level of hype, the Au Cheval burger lives up to it.

The “single” is actually a double, and the two patties, which are seared on the outside but still juicy inside, are topped with perfect portions of gooey American cheese, mayo, and pickles.

It’s very good on its own, but opt to add thick-cut, peppery bacon on top, and you’ll be surprised when the burger doesn’t stop to give you a royal wave.

4 Charles is from the people behind Au Cheval, and the burger here is similarly fantastic. at Au Cheval, it has two patties, tons of cheese, plenty of sauce, and a bun that soaks it all up.

But while the burgers are pretty much twins, the end results are very different, the Olsen twins in It Takes Two. At Au Cheval, your burger will ly share the table with a fried bologna sandwich and you’ll be surrounded by people drinking picklebacks and tallboys.

At 4 Charles, the burger is cut tableside by a white-gloved server, and it’s often shared as an appetizer before the $99 prime rib arrives. The small West Village space looks a rich uncle’s cigar room, and it’s nearly impossible to get a reservation before 11pm.

But once you actually get in, it’s one of the greatest burger experiences in NYC.

Yes, at $33 this burger is ridiculously expensive, but this isn’t a list of the most morally defensible foods in NYC.

The Black Label Burger at Minetta Tavern was one of the first super-luxe burgers in the city, and it’s still one of the best.

Maybe it’s the butter-basted patty made from dry-aged ribeye, or the mound of caramelized onions, or the custom Balthazar bun. Or maybe it’s all three.

Giada Paolini

$$$$

$$$$ 42 E. 20th St.

This burger, which is just available in the walk-in-only tavern section of the restaurant, is the Vitruvian Man of burgers.

It has a lot going on – a thick patty, smoky bacon, melted cheddar, smoked onion aioli – but the proportions of each are ideal, so you can taste them all without any one flavor overwhelming the others.

Even the bacon is cut in a way that allows you to get one slice in every bite, which we’d be willing to bet is how Da Vinci d his burgers.

Kate Previte

$$$$

$$$$ 276 Knickerbocker Ave

When you try the signature burger at this tiny Pakistani place in Bushwick, you’ll think back to a time in your life when you were constantly discovering great new things, sunsets and scented markers.

It might not look all that unique, but instead of mayo or mustard, it has spicy mint chutney, and the big patty is somehow lighter than it appears.

We could eat several of these in one sitting, and now that we’ve come up with that idea, we probably will.

Kate Previte

$$$$

$$$$ 183 W. 10th St.

If you’re a burger purist who thinks toppings are for the weak, Bar Sardine’s Fedora Burger is the burger that will change your mind.

It comes with crispy shoestring potatoes, pickled cucumbers, smoked cheddar, and BBQ mayo, but no one topping overpowers any of the others, and every bite has a balanced all-in-one effect.

This is best enjoyed alone at the bar – there won’t be room for two of you, anyway.

Ashley Sears

$$$$

$$$$ 647 E 11th St

The best thing about Virginia’s is the burger. We’re fairly certain the whole thing is basted in several sticks of butter before being topped with hunks of white cheddar and onion marmalade, and we’re fine with it.

It’s squat and simple, and you should add bacon to yours. The second best thing about this Alphabet City restaurant is that it’s never too crowded, so come here the next time you feel eating a really good burger in peace.

$$$$

$$$$ 364 Grand St

Le Big Matt Burger at Emmy Squared is the fraternal twin to the Emmy Burger at Emily.

It has two thinner patties instead of one big one, American cheese instead of cheddar, pickles, and spicy sauce – all on that insanely good pretzel bun you only find at the Emily establishments.

This is intended to resemble a fast food burger, but if that’s the case, we’ve spent our lives eating at the wrong fast food establishments.

Chona Kasinger

$$$$

$$$$ 201 1st Ave.

When someone recommends ordering the burger cooked medium, we’re usually wary. Some places do it to cover up the fact that their meat isn’t particularly high-quality, while your aunt does it because she’s still bitter about getting food poisoning on her honeymoon.

But Jeepney recommends its chori burger be ordered medium because the patty is a mix of beef and longanisa sausage, and your only question after biting into the juicy meat will be why more places don’t put spicy sausage in their burger patties. Not only is the patty excellent, but it’s topped with spicy ketchup, aioli, and a fried egg.

Even though the egg oozes when you press down on the brioche bun, the brioche bun absorbs it, so it never gets too messy.

The Fulton serves some of the best seafood in the city, it’s located on the water in the Seaport, and there’s even a giant sea monster mural on the wall. And yet despite all of that, you’d still be wise to order the burger here.

That’s because the juicy patty topped with fried onions, salty gruyere, and dijon chili mayo would be the standout dish if it were on the menu almost anywhere else.

The Fulton is definitely a seafood restaurant, but this burger makes it worth visiting even if you don’t want seafood.

$$$$

$$$$ 329 Van Brunt St

Much the burger at Peter Luger, the one at Red Hook Tavern is all about the meat. It’s just one big patty with American cheese and a cross-section of onion on a sesame bun that plays its role perfectly without causing any distractions.

The burger is intensely rich and salty – but we’re pretty sure we could eat several in one sitting. Maybe that’s because the patty is surprisingly light for its size, or maybe it’s because we lack self-restraint.

The only thing we don’t about this burger is that it comes with potato wedges, the least acceptable form of french fry. But we’re willing to take the high road and look past this.

Only served at lunch and brunch, Upland’s burger tastes what would happen if the In-N-Out double-double started going to Crossfit, got jacked, and then decided it should be a little healthier and topped itself with avocado and peppers. The whole thing is basically a love letter to California, complete with a tiny state flag at the top of the toothpick that holds it together. At $24, it’s not exactly cheap, but it’s also a lot less expensive than a flight to LAX.

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$$$$ 85 Broadway

Diner is a classic Williamsburg restaurant that’s located in an old dining car.

The nightly-changing menu will be scribbled onto your paper tablecloth by a server with better hair than you, and while anything that person writes down will be fantastic, the best thing here is the one thing that never changes: the burger. It’s a thick but not too-thick piece of meat with sharp cheese, a soft bun, and thick, crispy fries. You could split it with someone, but please don’t.

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$$$$ 605 Carlton Ave.

If we were giving out individual awards to every burger on this list, James’ would be Best Burger That You Don’t Expect To Be Such A Good Burger.

It’s the sleeper hit at this charming, upscale little neighborhood spot in Prospect Heights that also serves things sauteed scallops and risotto.

Come for their weekly Burger Night (all night on Mondays), when they also do a lamb version and a “Chef’s choice” variation.

Danielle Adams

$$$$ 234 Spring St

At some point over the course of history, burgers got unfairly stereotyped as un-fancy food.

You could use a lot of this guide as evidence that burgers can be just as fancy as cucumber sandwiches (or whatever finger food royal people currently eat), but perhaps the best example is Cafe Altro Paradiso’s.

Every ingredient is elevated, from the wagyu beef patty to the brioche bun to the Gorgonzola and balsamic caramelized radicchio on top. And you no longer need to come for lunch or sit at the bar to eat it, so there’s really no excuse for not checking this burger off your list.

$$$$ Madison Square Park

Shake Shack is fast food, but for what it is, the ShackBurger is just about perfect. A thin patty with crispy edges, toasted potato bun, high-quality lettuce and tomato – this is food you want to eat in a park or on your couch or in a bathroom at work so no one asks you for a bite. Factor in the price and convenience, and you have an invention on par with the T-shirt and rubber tires.

The West Village is almost disturbingly full of bars where you can eat burgers, and The Happiest Hour is another one of these.

The double-stacked burger here – which comes covered in melted cheese and special sauce – is exactly what you want to eat while slightly buzzed, and that’s convenient considering this is a place you probably came to drink. That being said, if you’re sober, it’ll make you pretty happy, too.

$$$$

$$$$ 331 W. 4th St.

The bun on this burger isn’t very big, but there’s a huge, loosely packed ball of beef in there. And that’s what really makes this burger special. That and the fact that you can eat it until 4am every day. Come after a long night out and eat a thick meat sandwich that’ll make your hands smell burger for days.

Source: https://www.theinfatuation.com/new-york/guides/best-burger-nyc

The 18 best burgers in Los Angeles

Here Are The Must-Try Burgers Across The United States (20 Photos)

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Hamburgers are truly America’s food. Born from the nation’s obsession with beef coupled with the modern highway system, the humble burger can be high-end or low—grabbed quickly via drive-thru or sought out as a destination.

It’s hard to say what makes a perfect burger. Some might argue that the Southern California standard of thin griddled patties, fresh toppings, American cheese, and tangy spread, is the only way to go.

Others might seek out something far fancier, pedigreed meat with bordelaise and fancy cheese. No matter one’s taste, there’s no question that Los Angeles is the epicenter for memorable burgers.

Here now are the 18 essential hamburgers in Los Angeles.

Removed: The Tripel, Hinoki & the Bird, Howard’s

Added: Goldburger, Grill ‘Em All, Hinano, Hollywood Burger

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

One of LA’s newest casual burger spots deserves to be one of its most essential, even this early in the game.

What makes HiHo so remarkable? The double-patty Wagyu beef is rich but not overwhelming, while the double cheese binds it all together.

The wisps of lettuce and tangy ketchup balance out the meat and cheese, while the thin bun just barely keeps it all together. Oh, and the fries are fantastic when properly fried.

Venice’s tiny Hinano Cafe is part beer-focused dive bar, part sandy seaside sneak-away spot, and part burger hero.

The bar turns out what may be one of the best burgers on the entire Westside, made simply from behind the bar by the same staff that pours pints.

There are fewer and fewer great bar burgers in LA these days (excluding names ERB and Ercoles), which just makes the simple pleasure of eating at Hinano Cafe all the more important.

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This Van Nuys staple continues to impress with its roadside flair and lovable crank-of-an-owner, Bill Elwell. he brings in fresh meat daily and griddles the patties in front of customers (mostly because there’s nowhere to hide inside the tiny shack), which means all anyone has to do is belly up to a stool with a friend and enjoy the show.

  • Open in Google Maps
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There is nothing in LA so iconic as a burger from Apple Pan. Wrapped in Formica counter seating and manned by occasionally gruff old men, the restaurant itself is a throwback to a different time. But it’s those burgers, especially the smoked hickory option with a mass of crunchy lettuce and strong pickles, that remain as timeless as ever.

Who knew a burger could be so polarizing? Yet here is the Father’s Office burger, a no-ketchup-allowed option served on a split roll and topped with caramelized onions and lots of arugula. This massive sandwich uses dry-aged beef and Maytag blue cheese for a remarkably different kind of burger.

The Double Double may very well be the city’s quintessential burger. It’s enduring deliciousness makes it one of the best and most important burgers on the planet.

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Chef Ludo Lefebvre’s Big Mec is the stuff of legends with its $18 price tag (sans fries) and shimmering photo-worthiness. Double-stacked patties drop with a foie gras-spiked Bordelaise sauce and melted cheddar, an ode to the famed burger at Chicago’s Au Cheval.

  • Open in Google Maps
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It’s tough to find a decent meal in this part of Hollywood, but Hollywood Burger has stood the test of time since opening in 2015 with plush Martin’s potato roll buns and a well-assembled California-style burger that tastes more of LA than NYC-based neighbor Shake Shack (which is basically right across the street).

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While purists might find a plant-based hamburger sacrilegious, the ones served up at Monty’s Good Burger just might change their minds. Made with an Impossible Burger patty, plant-based cheese, locally-sourced ingredients, and house-made sauces, all on a Bosch Bakery bun, the hamburgers have garnered a local following of mindful eaters.

Cassell’s Koreatown outlet offers a real-time history lesson. Hanging signage recalls a long-ago founding, while the space inside the Hotel Normandie serves as a reminder that times have indeed changed. Thankfully, the well-griddled burgers are as sturdy as ever, lovingly overseen by burger whisperer Christian Page both here and at the newer Downtown location.

  • Open in Google Maps
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11. Goldburger (for a limited time only)

Silver Lake’s Goldburger is in some ways the next logical step in LA’s ongoing burger evolution.

Founded by longtime burger fan Allen Yelent, the lightly smashed backyard-style burger pop-up currently draws legions of fans and long lines to a temporary space off Sunset in Silver Lake, giving the place that seamlessly cool, itinerant vibe that has pervaded the street burger scene in recent years. Keep checking in for one-off burger specials and extra-special pop-up nights, with drinks.

12. Burgers Never Say Die

Silver Lake’s smashed burger trend could trace a lineage to the former underground spot Burgers Never Say Die. Now with a prime location along Glendale Blvd, the lines form daily for simple McDonald’s-inspired cheeseburgers with melty American cheese, beef fat fries, and possibly the finest griddled meat in Los Angeles.

13. Hawkins House of Burgers

Watts’s most beloved meal is at Hawkins, where the loosely-formed beef patties arrive thick and impressive from their time on the griddle. Service is perilously slow, but in the end that just builds the hunger — which is exactly what’s needed when tackling these behemoths.

This Arts District favorite continues its reign as one of the most talked-about beef-and-bun options anywhere in Los Angeles. Former Mozza lead Matt Molina has turned up the seemingly simple burger to 11, showing that it’s not always about stacking ingredients. A simple seared patty on a plush bun, for a kind of ideal take on the McDonald’s cheeseburger.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

15. Original Tommy's Hamburgers

The fact that chili is offered as a hamburger topping at most burger stands in the Southland is a testament to the enduring influence of Tommy’s. The chain, now 70-plus years in marrying beef, bun, chili, and cheese, shows absolutely no signs of slowing down any time soon.

Andre Guerrero’s Filipino-inflected menu at Oinkster is a reflection of the man himself: colorful, filled with purpose, and open to all. The Eagle Rock location spawned the pastrami-toped Royale burger, and still plays spiritual home to LA’s annual Burger Week. The Royale burger with pastrami is a two-handed beast.

  • Open in Google Maps
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Pasadena claims to be the birthplace of the cheeseburger, and while the truth of such things are lost to history, there is no denying the enduring prominence of Pie ‘n Burger. A legend since 1963, this diner turned ode to all things burger continues to turn out impeccable California classics, complete with special sauce and lightly melted American cheese.

In the land of smashed patties and Instagram influence, Grill ‘Em All still stands tall.

The timeless Alhambra restaurant began life as one of LA’s hit food trucks, but has since parlayed that experience into a fan-favorite San Gabriel Valley strip mall restaurant with a heavy metal ethos and one simple message: more is more. This is burger decadence, complete with everything from fried eggs and deep-fried bacon to strawberry jam and peanut butter.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

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One of LA’s newest casual burger spots deserves to be one of its most essential, even this early in the game.

What makes HiHo so remarkable? The double-patty Wagyu beef is rich but not overwhelming, while the double cheese binds it all together.

The wisps of lettuce and tangy ketchup balance out the meat and cheese, while the thin bun just barely keeps it all together. Oh, and the fries are fantastic when properly fried.

Venice’s tiny Hinano Cafe is part beer-focused dive bar, part sandy seaside sneak-away spot, and part burger hero.

The bar turns out what may be one of the best burgers on the entire Westside, made simply from behind the bar by the same staff that pours pints.

There are fewer and fewer great bar burgers in LA these days (excluding names ERB and Ercoles), which just makes the simple pleasure of eating at Hinano Cafe all the more important.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

This Van Nuys staple continues to impress with its roadside flair and lovable crank-of-an-owner, Bill Elwell. he brings in fresh meat daily and griddles the patties in front of customers (mostly because there’s nowhere to hide inside the tiny shack), which means all anyone has to do is belly up to a stool with a friend and enjoy the show.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

There is nothing in LA so iconic as a burger from Apple Pan. Wrapped in Formica counter seating and manned by occasionally gruff old men, the restaurant itself is a throwback to a different time. But it’s those burgers, especially the smoked hickory option with a mass of crunchy lettuce and strong pickles, that remain as timeless as ever.

Who knew a burger could be so polarizing? Yet here is the Father’s Office burger, a no-ketchup-allowed option served on a split roll and topped with caramelized onions and lots of arugula. This massive sandwich uses dry-aged beef and Maytag blue cheese for a remarkably different kind of burger.

The Double Double may very well be the city’s quintessential burger. It’s enduring deliciousness makes it one of the best and most important burgers on the planet.

Chef Ludo Lefebvre’s Big Mec is the stuff of legends with its $18 price tag (sans fries) and shimmering photo-worthiness. Double-stacked patties drop with a foie gras-spiked Bordelaise sauce and melted cheddar, an ode to the famed burger at Chicago’s Au Cheval.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

It’s tough to find a decent meal in this part of Hollywood, but Hollywood Burger has stood the test of time since opening in 2015 with plush Martin’s potato roll buns and a well-assembled California-style burger that tastes more of LA than NYC-based neighbor Shake Shack (which is basically right across the street).

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

While purists might find a plant-based hamburger sacrilegious, the ones served up at Monty’s Good Burger just might change their minds. Made with an Impossible Burger patty, plant-based cheese, locally-sourced ingredients, and house-made sauces, all on a Bosch Bakery bun, the hamburgers have garnered a local following of mindful eaters.

Cassell’s Koreatown outlet offers a real-time history lesson. Hanging signage recalls a long-ago founding, while the space inside the Hotel Normandie serves as a reminder that times have indeed changed. Thankfully, the well-griddled burgers are as sturdy as ever, lovingly overseen by burger whisperer Christian Page both here and at the newer Downtown location.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Silver Lake’s Goldburger is in some ways the next logical step in LA’s ongoing burger evolution.

Founded by longtime burger fan Allen Yelent, the lightly smashed backyard-style burger pop-up currently draws legions of fans and long lines to a temporary space off Sunset in Silver Lake, giving the place that seamlessly cool, itinerant vibe that has pervaded the street burger scene in recent years. Keep checking in for one-off burger specials and extra-special pop-up nights, with drinks.

Silver Lake’s smashed burger trend could trace a lineage to the former underground spot Burgers Never Say Die. Now with a prime location along Glendale Blvd, the lines form daily for simple McDonald’s-inspired cheeseburgers with melty American cheese, beef fat fries, and possibly the finest griddled meat in Los Angeles.

Watts’s most beloved meal is at Hawkins, where the loosely-formed beef patties arrive thick and impressive from their time on the griddle. Service is perilously slow, but in the end that just builds the hunger — which is exactly what’s needed when tackling these behemoths.

This Arts District favorite continues its reign as one of the most talked-about beef-and-bun options anywhere in Los Angeles. Former Mozza lead Matt Molina has turned up the seemingly simple burger to 11, showing that it’s not always about stacking ingredients. A simple seared patty on a plush bun, for a kind of ideal take on the McDonald’s cheeseburger.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

The fact that chili is offered as a hamburger topping at most burger stands in the Southland is a testament to the enduring influence of Tommy’s. The chain, now 70-plus years in marrying beef, bun, chili, and cheese, shows absolutely no signs of slowing down any time soon.

Andre Guerrero’s Filipino-inflected menu at Oinkster is a reflection of the man himself: colorful, filled with purpose, and open to all. The Eagle Rock location spawned the pastrami-toped Royale burger, and still plays spiritual home to LA’s annual Burger Week. The Royale burger with pastrami is a two-handed beast.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Pasadena claims to be the birthplace of the cheeseburger, and while the truth of such things are lost to history, there is no denying the enduring prominence of Pie ‘n Burger. A legend since 1963, this diner turned ode to all things burger continues to turn out impeccable California classics, complete with special sauce and lightly melted American cheese.

In the land of smashed patties and Instagram influence, Grill ‘Em All still stands tall.

The timeless Alhambra restaurant began life as one of LA’s hit food trucks, but has since parlayed that experience into a fan-favorite San Gabriel Valley strip mall restaurant with a heavy metal ethos and one simple message: more is more. This is burger decadence, complete with everything from fried eggs and deep-fried bacon to strawberry jam and peanut butter.

  • Open in Google Maps
  • Foursquare

Source: https://la.eater.com/maps/best-essential-los-angeles-burgers

The Best Burgers in the U.S

Here Are The Must-Try Burgers Across The United States (20 Photos)

Photo © Sara Hanna

The burger, America’s quintessential comfort food, can now be enjoyed in an impossibly endless number of ways.

There are round-the-clock burgers at 24-hour-roadside joints and ephemeral late-night burgers sold out in mere minutes; burgers grilled in hundred-year-old cast-iron broilers and burgers steamed in state-of-the-art ovens; burgers crafted from Kobe beef imported from Japan and burgers made with Black Angus beef from just down the road. It’s clearly a great time to love the burger. Here, we’ve singled out the best.

Photo © Justin Fox Burks

Signature Burger: John T. Burger.

Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman (F&W Best New Chefs 2013) pay tribute to food writer and Southern Foodways Alliance Director John T. Edge with this Oklahoma City-style patty that’s smashed and griddled with onions. A genius touch: the shredded lettuce dressed in salt and pickle juice.

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Photo © Vittlemonster.com

Signature Burger: Mission Burger.

These outrageously delicious burgers made their debut at the short-lived Mission Burger pop-up in the Duc Loi Supermarket in 2009 and have now found another unorthodox home: this six-lane bowling club. Its loose, juicy patties are seared in beef fat, topped with Monterey Jack cheese and caramelized onions and served in buns from Acme Bread.

Photo © Amanda Friedman

Signature Burger: Double Cheeseburger.

F&W Best New Chef 2010 Roy Choi gives his architecturally impressive burger an Asian twist with toasted sesame seeds in the mayo and fresh shiso leaves on top of the lettuce. In keeping with Choi’s more-is-more ethos, there’s also tomato confit, pickled red onions, hot sauce and sharp cheddar cheese, all on a buttered brioche bun.

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Photo © Pableaux Johnson

Signature Burger: The Company Burger.

From Holeman and Finch alumnus Adam Biderman come two loosely packed, juicy patties topped with American cheese, house-made pickles and red onion.

Photo © Paul Wagtouicz

Signature Burger: Sebastian’s Steakhouse Burger.

Chef Jeremy Spector’s super-flavorful patties combine a 21-day dry-aged beef blend with fatty deckle. They’re seared on a cast-iron skillet before they're topped with melted American cheese and caramelized onions.

Photo © William Brinson Photography

Signature Burger: ShackBurger (Black Angus beef patty topped with American cheese, tomato, lettuce, and “Shack Sauce,” served in a grilled potato bun).

Uber restaurateur Danny Meyer’s beloved mini empire has a cult following among Gotham burger geeks. Must-order items include the ShackBurger (served with American cheese, tomato, lettuce, and “Shack Sauce” in an old-fashioned wax paper wrapper) and a “hand-spun” chocolate-and-peanut-butter custard shake.

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Photo © Paul Sobota

Signature Burger: Lola Burger.

Michael Symon, F&W Best New Chef 1998, specializes in “meat on meat” burgers at his Ohio-based chain B-Spot. Named after his Cleveland flagship, the Lola Burger could almost double as a breakfast sandwich since it's piled high with bacon and a fried egg (in addition to pickled red onions, cheddar cheese and mayo).

Signature Burger: Black Label Burger (topped with caramelized onions).

Minetta Tavern’s excellent burgers use a beef blend—dry-aged rib eye, skirt steak, brisket and short rib—from famed purveyor Pat LaFrieda, and buns from Balthazar Bakery.

Photo © Jeff Moore

Signature Burger: Burger (two cheeseburgers on a house-made bun).

At Holeman & Finch, star chef Linton Hopkins reserves his burgers for those in the know. From the time the restaurant opens each day at 5 p.m., Hopkins and his team will only make 24 of the off-menu item. And when he’s out, he’s out. So you better show up early.

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Photo © Jess Lander

Signature Burger: Cheeseburger.

Even superstar chef Thomas Keller is a fan of the West Coast chain—and with good reason. The cooked-to-order burgers are made with beef from Southwest ranches and served with hand-cut fries. For a messier, more indulgent experience, order your burger “Animal Style” for extra sauce and chopped grilled onions.

Photo courtesy of Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink

Signature Burger: Black Angus Burger (served in a brioche bun).

An optional topping for star chef Michael Schwartz’s Harris Ranch Black Angus beef burger: house-smoked bacon.

Photo © Bill Holmes

Signature Burger: House-ground hamburger (served in a grilled rosemary focaccia).

Instead of traditional cucumber pickles, legendary chef-owner Judy Rodgers accents her burgers with thin-cut zucchini strips pickled in apple cider vinegar, mustard seeds and turmeric.

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Photo courtesy of Perini Ranch Steakhouse

Signature Burger: Ranch Burger (topped with mushrooms, onions, green chiles and choice of cheddar or provolone cheese).

Self-taught cowboy cook Tom Perini masters the art of open-flame cooking using mesquite coals at his hay barn turned steakhouse, smack in the middle of the state.

Photo © Jared Razzano

Signature Burger: Bacon Double Cheeseburger (two four-ounce beef patties with white American cheese, smoked bacon and Russian dressing in a white bun).

A superb accompaniment to the burgers: house-made kettle chips.

Photo © Michael Lamotte

Signature Burger: Ahi Burger (seared Ahi tuna burger topped with ginger-wasabi mayonnaise and Asian slaw, served in a toasted egg bun).

Brothers Joel and Duncan Gott’s witty, reimagined ’50s diner used to be named Taylor’s Refresher, but it’s still a Napa-area favorite for comfort cravings—especially burgers.

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Photo © Michael Franzman

Signature Burger: The Original Burger (prepared with a combination of chuck and sirloin beef).

Many restaurants claim to be the birthplace of the hamburger. Louis’ Lunch, in New Haven, Connecticut, since 1900, is a leading contender. The meaty hand-shaped patties are grilled on antique cast-iron broilers over an open flame.

Photo © Tracy O’Connor

Signature Burger: Dyer’s Cheeseburger.

The legendary patties here are pounded thin before they’re cooked in a cast-iron skillet filled with grease for a deliciously crisp exterior.

Photo courtesy of The Spotted Pig

Signature Burger: Spotted Pig Burger.

When the Pig opened in 2004, it was known mostly for its celebrity owners—Jay-Z and Mario Batali, to name two. Now April Bloomfield is famous in her own right for her excellent gastropub menu, which includes an excellent burger made with brisket, rump and chuck, topped with Roquefort cheese.

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Photo © John Lee

Signature Burger: The Office Burger (dry-aged beef patty topped with Gruyère cheese, Maytag blue cheese, arugula and applewood-bacon compote).

Sang Yoon’s noodle bar Lukshon might be getting a ton of buzz, but the provocative chef first made his name with his dry-aged beef burgers. Among the finest in the country, they justify the strict no-ketchup policy. The 36 craft beers on tap change seasonally.

Photo courtesy of The Little Owl

Signature Burger: Bacon Cheeseburger.

Chef Joey Campanaro gets his beef from famed Manhattan purveyor Pat LaFrieda and serves each burger on a house-baked bun, with just a hint of molasses. Pickles from legendary purveyor Guss’ Pickles are served on the side.

Photo © Daniel Chun

Signature Burger: Steamed Cheeseburger (prepared with Vermont cheddar).

Ted’s has been serving its steamed burgers—a regional specialty—since 1959.

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Photo © Joe Hakim/TheHungryDudes.com

Signature Burger: World Famous Ground Round Burger (ground round beef topped with Velveeta, mustard, ketchup, dill pickle chips and onions).

The popular no-frills burgers here have been served since the late 1940s.

Photo courtesy of Craigie on Main

Signature Burger: Beeurger.

Star chef Tony Maws adds bone marrow and dehydrated miso to his Bar Burger, and cooks it in a low heat CVap oven, followed by a quick char on the plancha.

Photo © Andy Katz

Signature Burger: HBG Burger (fresh-ground Meyer Natural Angus beef patty topped with Alexander Valley Gourmet pickles, served in a toasted Costeaux Bakery sourdough bun; roasted garlic mayonnaise on the side).

For his terrific burger, star chef Douglas Keane uses a 70-30 lean-to-fat ground beef ratio.

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Photo © fgeel

Signature Burger: Cheeseburger (topped with onions, served in a soft bun).

This old-school diner has built its reputation on heavenly sliders piled high with thin-cut onions. It’s been using the same butcher for the past 50 years.

Photo courtesy of Peter Luger

Signature Burger: Luger Burger (served with raw onions and house-made steak sauce, served in a sesame bun).

The broiled “Luger Burger”—prepared with a porterhouse and prime chuck blend—at this legendary steakhouse is served only during lunch until 3:45 p.m.

Photo © Sara Hanna

Signature Burger: Farm Burger (topped with Vermont aged smoked white cheddar cheese, caramelized onions and a special house sauce).

This farm-to-table burger spot grinds its grass-fed, dry-aged and locally sourced meat daily. The “build it” option includes unexpected toppings cured lardo, oxtail marmalade and roasted bone marrow.

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Source: https://www.foodandwine.com/travel/best-burgers-us

The 20 Hamburgers You Must Eat Before You Die

Here Are The Must-Try Burgers Across The United States (20 Photos)

The hamburger is a symbol of everything that makes America great. Straightforward, egalitarian, substantial, and good-natured, it is also a little bloody at times.

It may come big and ungarnished, the East Coast ideal, tender and untroubled by bones or gristle, everything you look for in a filet mignon but seldom find.

It may be the West Coast model, swelling with vegetation, brimming with health and well-being, piled high with all that a seed catalog can provide.

A great burger, regardless of regional differences, instills a sense of optimism and fulfillment, that all is right at the table or the counter or the woodgrain, screwed-to-the-floor, fast-food booth.

At its best, it eliminates the need for conversation or the urge to glance up at the TV over the bar. If you find yourself eating silently, eyes closed, ignoring everything around you, even the unavoidable burger-joint din, you have come upon a burger that can be pronounced a success.

Of course, it must be molded by hand, artfully seared, and offered medium-rare. If that’s too much to ask, not overcooked would be nice.

Whose idea was it anyway that serving desiccated burgers to Americans would enable all of us to spring back to health? Excessive reliance on condiments is another alarming development, especially in the matter of ketchup, the burger Band-Aid.

Ketchup is valuable only when an emergency jolt of moisture, sweetness, acidity, and flavor is required. No hamburger is inedible if you put enough ketchup on it, but no hamburger that has ketchup on it can be considered great.

Mustard is a mistake, unless you’re French and welcome a vinegary jolt with your food, while pickles, those subversive little sweet and sour instruments, fill me with dread. When I find pickles furtively inserted into my burger, I generally look to the heavens with a clenched fist and sob, “Why?“

I’ve always claimed I’d go a long way for the right burger, and indeed I did. I traveled 23,750 miles—that’s just 1,152 miles short of encircling the globe at the equator—looking for the best ones in America. I consumed more than 150,000 calories but resisted drinking a can of soda with every burger, saving more than 22,000 calories that way.

I ate crazy burgers, Kobe burgers, bison burgers, longhorn burgers, ostrich burgers, onion burgers, lamb burgers, and of course, cheeseburgers. (Note that cheese goes so well with burgers that the word is assembled differently, with no space in between.

) I tried fast-food burgers, and while there’s a sameness to them that overwhelms any attempts at excellence, I found some mighty fine values on those dollar menus, assuming you don’t mind your burgers hard and dry, the smiles on the faces of the teenagers who take your order. I visited Burger Heaven. Actually, I went to a few places called that.

I was also in burger hell, which is Milwaukee, home of the butter burger, essentially meat saturated with grease.

My goal was to find the twenty best burgers, and with apologies to all the restaurants, stands, bars, and grills I missed, I’d to believe I did well. I ate 162 burgers in ninety-three establishments. Some of them were fancified, proffering foie gras-stuffed burgers costing as much as $29.

Some were dumps, with burgers hovering near a buck. At no time, despite pleas from loved ones, did I have a physician standing by. I found no correlation between price and tastiness, nor did ambience count for a great deal.

A burger requires only a cook of modest accomplishments, one who knows enough to remove it from the fire before it has lost its juiciness and not to press down hard with a spatula—squishing might work with grilled cheese, but it’s fatal for burgers.

Waitresses who work in burger joints can have scars and tattoos, as long as they’re not self-inflicted. Motorcycles are fine, provided they’re not parked inside.

Source: https://www.gq.com/story/hamburger-death-eat

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